watching TV

Tips for Purchasing an HD TV

in Technology

Since its launch in 1998, High Definition Televisions (HD TVs) have been all the rage. Read on for the latest HD TV technology that will have your friends drooling.

Technology has skyrocketed for these replacements for the standard analog TV running on TV Aerial, making trying to keep up with the Joneses comparable to the mid-1990s computer craze.

HDTV Information: Which HDTV is the best?

You’ll definitely want a flat-screen panel TV. Those are the ones you can hang above your fireplace like high tech, high def painting. Next, decide if you want an LCD or Plasma. According to HD experts, LCD technically has a longer lifespan and is less affected by ambient light than a plasma screen, though a plasma TV displays colors slightly better. LCD TVs outsell plasma by a large margin.

Pitfalls When Buying HD

It is important to know whether the HD TV you have your eyes on has an integrated digital tuner or if it is simply HD ready or HD compatible. TVs with digital tuners included are ready to take advantage of the uber pixelate and clarity of HD signals right away while HD-ready TVs will need to be upgraded with a tuner at a later point. You also need a quality tv aerial installation service for better results on the HDTV.

Best Resolution for Your Preferences

Next, decide on what kind of resolution you want. If you are going to watch mainly movies with awesome special effects like the new Transformers, then get 1080i. If you are a sports fan who religiously watches Monday Football and the NBA playoffs, you are better off with 720p. The two resolutions are comparable but 720p displays motion better while 1080i has slightly better clarity.

1080p and 120Hz will be Perfect for You

The latest must-have features for HDTV buyers is 1080p. Better than both 1080i and 720p, this resolution promises crystal clear pictures. Only problem? Not much is broadcast in 1080p yet. A more practical hot feature is the 120Hz refresh rate. Until recently most HD TV s had a 60Hz refresh rate, but making sure to include 120Hz in your new HD TV will ensure that your friend’s eyes bulge extra wide when they see the picture.

Analog on HD

Lastly, yes, sometimes watching TV on your new HD television will actually look worse than on your old cathode ray set. This is due to low-quality signal being literally blown up to magnify the defects. It’s as if you enlarged a blurry photograph on your TV. To avoid this pitfall, purchase your cable provider’s HD package and buy/rent only HD and blu-ray DVDs to feed to your new HD baby. Once the analog signal goes quiet for good in February of 2009, this won’t even be an issue.